Ptolemaic Kings > Ptolemy IV Philopater

Ptolemy IV Philopater

Background

Ptolemy IV PhilopatorGold octadrachm issued by Ptolemy IV Philopator, British MuseumGold octadrachm issued by Ptolemy IV Philopator, British MuseumPharaohReign221–204 BC (Ptolemaic)PredecessorPtolemy IIISuccessorPtolemy VRoyal titulary [show]FatherPtolemy IIIMotherBerenice IIPtolemy IV Philopator (Greek: Πτολεμαῖος Φιλοπάτωρ Ptolemaĩos Philopátōr; reigned 221–204 BC), son of Ptolemy III and Berenice II of Egypt, was the fourth Pharaoh of Ptolemaic Egypt. The decline of the Ptolemaic dynasty began under the reign of Ptolemy IV.Contents [hide]1Family2Reign3Legacy4Ancestry5References6Bibliography7External linksFamily[edit]Among the children of Ptolemy IV Philopator and his sister-wife Arsinoe III of Egypt was Ptolemy V Epiphanes, who married Cleopatra I Syra, daughter of Antiochus III the Great and Laodice III.Reign[edit]Ptolemy IV's reign was inaugurated by the murder of his mother,[1] and he was always under the dominion of favourites, male and female, who indulged his vices and conducted the government as they pleased. Self-interest led his ministers to make serious preparations to meet the attacks of Antiochus III the Great on Coele-Syria including Judea, and Ptolemy himself was present at the great Egyptian victory of Raphia (217 BC) which secured the northern borders of the kingdom for the remainder of his reign.Mediterranean in 218 BC.The arming of Egyptians in this campaign had a disturbing effect upon the native population of Egypt, leading to the secession of Upper Egypt under pharaohs Harmachis (also known as Hugronaphor) and Ankmachis (also known as Chaonnophris), thus creating a kingdom that occupied much of the country and lasted nearly twenty years.Philopator was devoted to orgiastic forms of religion and literary dilettantism.[2] He built a temple to Homer and composed a tragedy, to which his favourite Agathocles added a commentary. He married his sister Arsinoë III (about 220 BC), but continued to be ruled by his mistress Agathoclea, sister of Agathocles. In late c. 210 BC, Agathoclea may have given birth to a son from her affair with Ptolemy IV, who may have died shortly after his birth.Ptolemy is said to have built a giant ship known as the tessarakonteres ("forty"), a huge galley and possibly the largest human-powered vessel ever built. This showpiece galley was described by Callixenus of Rhodes, writing in the 3rd century BC, and quoted by Athenaeus in the 2nd century AD.[3] Plutarch also mentions that Ptolemy Philopator owned this immense vessel in his Life of Demetrios.[4] The current theory is that Ptolemy's ship was an oversized catamaran galley, measuring 128 m 420 ft.Ptolemy IV is a major antagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes purported events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria.Legacy[edit]Ptolemy IV's reign was also marked by trade with other contemporaneous polities. In the 1930s, excavations by Mattingly at a fortress close to Port Dunford (the likely Nikon of antiquity) in present-day southern Somalia yielded a number of Ptolemaic coins. Among these pieces were 17 copper mints from the Ptolemy III, Ptolemy IV and Ptolemy V dynasties, as well as late Imperial Rome and Mamluk Sultanate coins.[5]Ancestry[edit][show]Ancestors of Ptolemy IV PhilopatorReferences[edit]Jump up ^ Polybius, XV 25.2. Cf. Zenobius, V 94.Jump up ^ Bevan, Edwyn (1927). The House of Ptolemy: a History of Egypt under the Ptolemaic Dynasty. London: Methuen. p. 233.Jump up ^ Deipnosophistae V 37.Jump up ^ Demetrius 43.4-5.Jump up ^ Hildegard Temporini (ed.) (1978). Politische Geschichte: (Provinzien und Randvölker: Mesopotamien, Armenien, Iran, Südarabien, Rom und der Ferne Osten)], Part 2, Volume 9. Walter de Gruyter. p. 977. ISBN 3110071754. Retrieved 1 November 2014.Bibliography[edit]Clayton, Peter A. (2006). Chronicles of the Pharaohs: the reign-by-reign record of the rulers and dynasties of ancient Egypt. Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-28628-0.Public Domain This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "article name needed". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.External links[edit]Ptolemy Philopator I at LacusCurtius — (Chapter VII of E. R. Bevan's House of Ptolemy, 1923)Ptolemy IV — (Egyptian Royal Genealogy)Ptolemaic Genealogy: Possible child of Ptolemy IVThe great revolt of the Egyptians:205–186 BC (2004)Ptolemy IV Philopator entry in historical sourcebook by Mahlon H. SmithPtolemy IV PhilopatorPtolemaic DynastyBorn: Unknown Died: 204 BCPreceded byPtolemy III EuergetesPharaoh of Egypt221–204 BCSucceeded byPtolemy V Epiphanes

Ptolemaic Dynasty of Egypt

KingTitleMeaningReignWife/Co-RulerReign
Ptolemy ISoterSavior305-285 BCEBerenice IReign
Ptolemy IIPhiladelphusSister-loving285-246 BCEArsinoe IReign
Ptolemy IIIEuergetes IThe Benefactor246-221 BCEBerenice IIReign
Ptolemy IVPhilopaterFather-loving221-204 BCEArsinoe IIIReign
Ptolemy VEpiphanesThe Illustrious204-180 BCEReign
Ptolemy VIPhilometorMother-loving180-145 BCECleopatra I
Cleopatra II & Ptolemy VIII
Ptolemy Eupator
180–176 BCE
170–163 BCE
153–150 BCE
Ptolemy VIINeos PhilopatorFather-loving145 BCECleopatra IIReign
Ptolemy VIIIEuergetes IIThe Benefactor170–116 BCECleopatra II145–131/130 BCE
Cleopatra II124–116 BCE
Ptolemy VIIIEuergetes IIThe Benefactor170–116 BCECleopatra II124–116 BCE
Ptolemy IXSoter IIThe Savior116-107 BCECleopatra III107–101 BCE
Ptolemy XAlexander I107-88 BCECleopatra III107–101 BCE
Ptolemy IXSoter IIThe Savior88-80 BCE
Ptolemy XIAlexander II80 BCEBerenice III80 BCE
Ptolemy XIIINeos Dionysos/AuletesNew Dionysus/Flute Player80–51 BCEBerenice IV58–55 BCE
Cleopatra VII51-30 BCEReign
Ptolemy XIII PhysconDionysos51-47 BCEReign
Ptolemy XIVPhilopatorFather-loving47-44 BCEReign
Ptolemy XVCaesarionLittle Caesar44-30 BCEReign

Sources

Primary Sources

Secondary Sources

History of Humanity - History Archive Logo
History of Humanity - History Mysteries Logo
History of Humanity - Ancient Mesopotamia Logo
History of Humanity - Egypt History Logo
History of Humanity - Persian Empire Logo
History of Humanity - Greek History Logo
History of Humanity - Alexander the Great Logo
History of Humanity - Roman History Logo
History of Humanity - Punic Wars Logo
History of Humanity - Alexander the Great Logo
History of Humanity - Revolutionary War Logo
History of Humanity - Mafia History Logo

Warning: file_get_contents(https://framework.sabali.co/scripts/jquery.js): failed to open stream: HTTP request failed! HTTP/1.1 404 Not Found in /home/humanityhistory/public_html/addons/alexander-the-great.org/blueprint/templates/scripts.php on line 3

Warning: file_get_contents(https://framework.sabali.co/scripts/cover-header.js): failed to open stream: HTTP request failed! HTTP/1.1 404 Not Found in /home/humanityhistory/public_html/addons/alexander-the-great.org/blueprint/templates/scripts.php on line 4

Warning: file_get_contents(https://framework.sabali.co/scripts/magnify.js): failed to open stream: HTTP request failed! HTTP/1.1 404 Not Found in /home/humanityhistory/public_html/addons/alexander-the-great.org/blueprint/templates/scripts.php on line 5